Tagged: Linux

Pokemon Go is Not Dead

Podcast: EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS Subscribe: Android | RSSMorning Geeks! Episode 18 show notes Looking at Jungle – A Photicular Book Looking at Arccos Driver – Real Superhero suits for formal wear – Doug Liman moves to DC Justice League Dark – 25 years of Linux – Steve Wozniak warns on ditching the headphones – Leslie Jones Hack – Russian Superhero movie called “Guardians” – Chris Hemsworth and Tom Hiddleston visit the Hospital – Is Pokemon-Go Dead? No. **New to This Week** – Mechanic: Resurrection – Hands of Stone – Don’t Breathe – Daylight’s End Full Movie HD PREVIEWS – Snowden The Movie – RINGS DVD – The Jungle Book **

Game Sale Alert: Steam’s 2014 Summer Sale is Live

It’s that time of the year again folks. Valve has started it’s annual Steam Summer sale as of today. As of today, a lot of games on the Steam Store are going to be heavily discounted. There will be some daily deals which last for 24 hours, flash deals which last for up to half a day and deals voted for by the steam community. There will be new deals every single day. For me, the best deals to be had on day one are Mirror’s Edge(£2.45), Skyrim(£4.99) and The Witcher 2(£2.99). With new deals every day, it’s important to keep an eye out to see if you find a game you like on sale. If you see game that you like, jump on it! There is a good chance that you won’t see a good deal like this one on steam until around Christmas time. Some these...

Source Connect by Source Elements: Eliminate Latency Connection

Podcast: EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSIf you are a musician that has tried to collaborate over the Internet, you know latency of a signal can kill the session. There are a few companies working on reducing latency – Source Elements is one of those companies. While you cannot do a live jam session without issue, you can do some pretty cool stuff with this software – record a track and have another record their track to merge together with quality of 320 kbps. If you are running an interview you can reduce the dead air that some connections get because of the lag time. With Source Connect Pro, you can reduce latency to as much as 100 milliseconds – the same speed of a cell phone connection. All you need is access to a Chrome browser (other browsers coming soon). You can run the software on...

Is Office for iPad Too Late in the Game?

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS This week it was about getting work done and planning the next moves. Sometimes the moves just come to me. Will be heading to NAB from a last minute sponsor, so making plans for Vegas again. Last night’s TWIGG brought David Esquire to the show. He’s been using Glass for photography. Luke and I try to keep the lid off this episode. But karaoke must be sung! The Absolute LoJack Challenge is over. Congrats to Rust and Wendy as they won 1 year subscriptions to Absolute LoJack. Hotline – 608-205-4378 – geekazine (at) gmail.com Download the audio version Subscribe to the podcast via: iTunes – TechPodcasts – Stitcher You can catch me on Twitter @geekazine – Facebook Group – About.Me Other shows: Day in Tech History – Geekazine Special Media Feed – iPad365 – This Week in Google Glass Geek Smack: Office...

Acer: AC100 Small Business Server with Four Bays

This is a perfect device for a small business or a company that has a remote office. The AC100 is a four-bay drive server that allows you to backup computer, hold and transfer data, or do other tasks you may need around the office. The server is Energy Star efficient, and can have Windows, Linux or another server loaded on the AC100. It can come preconfigured in RAID 0,1,5 models. I talked with Michael from Acer at VMWorld 2012 about this server.  

Boxee: Live TV Tuner USB Dongle – CES 2012

Boxee: Live TV Tuner USB Dongle – CES 2012

Podcast: EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSWe are back talking with Boxee to see what’s going on with this Over the Top TV solution. They introduced a new way to add local channels to your Boxee. The new Live TV tuner is a USB dongle that you connect to the Boxee. Plug your cable or antenna to the dongle, and watch your shows from the Boxee box. There is also a social network option to this device that will help you find shows your friends are watching. Get Boxee on Amazon The Boxee live TV tuner USB only works on Boxee box. They have put out version 1.5 for Windows, Mac, and Linux, but also announced they will be moving away from those platforms to focus on the Over the Top TV device. Boxee Dongle is $49. The Boxee is available at $179 [cessponsor]

Marvell: Showing off $180 One Tablet Per Child Concept – #CES 2012

Marvell: Showing off $180 One Tablet Per Child Concept – #CES 2012

Podcast: EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSA few years ago, we learned about OLPC – One Laptop Per Child. This was the initiative to get computers in the hands of children in need. Even though it started as a great idea, somewhere along the line it stalled a bit. Now, Marvell is helping to bring it back – this time as a tablet. The OTPC they were showing off is a concept piece ready for production. The idea is to stick with the $100 model as close as possible, right now they are at a $180 production cost. Deemed OLPC XO 3.0, the tablet has an eight inch screen, ARM based ARMADA PXA618 SOC processor, and built on the Linux platform. Mini Wikipedia is one of many apps on the device (for off-line access). The tablet charges by a solar powered lid, plugged in to 10-25 watts of DC power, or throught the hand crank. The solar...

Ubuntu on Mobile Devices – Do We Really Need Another Flavor of Linux?

Ubuntu on Mobile Devices – Do We Really Need Another Flavor of Linux?

Ubuntu may be headed to mobile devices and TV’s (aka “Smartscreens”). That means another derivative of Linux will enter the market. Will Ubuntu disrupt the market?

Dropbox Turns into Social Network with Frenzy for Mac

Dropbox Turns into Social Network with Frenzy for Mac

Dropbox is a Cloud service that allows you to place and retrieve files wherever you are. Since it’s inception in 2008, Dropbox has been a great way to share pictures, documents and more. But I never expected it to become a Social Network, too. Frenzy is an application for Mac OS X (what, no Windows?) that sits in the menubar and monitors the Dropbox shares. You add your friends to your lists. When you share a file, they can get notified. When they share or update a file, you can get notified. You can even update statuses and find out what is going on with the friends or colleagues in your network. Frenzy is a great option for those Small businesses that need to share files and communicate, but don’t want to do that through Facebook or Twitter. The Reality is: Frenzy will be a great way for...

Fun with Windows Command Line Directory Navigation

Fun with Windows Command Line Directory Navigation

Note: When I was writing this, I could not get the backslash character to display, so I use [backslash] to represent it in the text. I am not new to the Windows command line. Back in my tech support days, it was frequently faster to tell callers to click on the menu, click on start, type “cmd,” click “Run,” type in a command (frequently it was ipconfig /all) and tell me what they saw rather than walk them through opening a bunch of windows one after another. I was reading up on tricks for navigating the Linux command line and I wondered whether they would work in Windows, so I fired up my XP box for some testing (it’s the only Windows machine I have). I already knew about using wildcards in directory strings. This picture shows using wildcards to navigate from C:[backslash] to my My Documents directory....

Installing Fedora in Virtual Box

Installing Fedora in Virtual Box

This is the first of a series of posts about installing Fedora Linux. Fedora is the free version of Red Hat Linux. It also serves as a testing ground and communication pipeline to the larger Linux community for Red Hat. The Fedora project was formally separated from Red Hat under the name “Fedora Core” (now simply “Fedora”) in 2003, but the Red Hat company sponsors and benefits from the Fedora project. Fedora is free and open source. Red Hat is open source, but not free. Red Hat has a large presence in the enterprise market; the current commercial release is called RHEL (for Red Hat Enterprise Linux) v. 6. The current release of Fedora is v. 14. Note that the version numbers for RHEL are not coordinated with the version numbers for Red Hat Linux/Fedora Core/Fedora. When you pay for RHEL, you pay for support. It’s a business...

Squeezing Lenny:  Updating Debian 5 to Debian 6

Squeezing Lenny: Updating Debian 5 to Debian 6

The big news in the Linux world last weekend was the release of Debian 6, named “Squeeze.” It’s been in the works for two years. (Debian releases are named after characters in the original Toy Story movie.) Debian is one of the three granddaddies of Linux (the other two are Slackware and Red Hat); most distributions are described as “Debian-based,” “Slackware-based,” or “Fedora-based.” Ubuntu, for example, is based on Debian. It is also huge; a full installation set of disks takes up eight DVDs or 52 CDs. (That’s why the net install, which I described in a series of posts starting here, is popular.) I wanted to upgrade my Debian computer, a Dell Dimension P4 with 4 GBs of RAM, which doubles as my home file-server, but I did not want to play 52-pickup with CDs, so I went hunting for instructions as to how to upgrade on-line...

Firestarter Firewall for Linux–First Run

Firestarter Firewall for Linux–First Run

This is the first of two posts on the Firestarter firewall for Linux. See the note at the end of this post for information about getting Firestarter. Firestarter is the easiest Linux firewall front-end I’ve found. I’ve used it off-and-on since I loaded my first Linux box almost six years ago. Unlike many Windows firewall programs I’ve used, it doesn’t nag; doesn’t display useless messages; and, being free and open source, doesn’t ask for money for upgrades. It just sits there and works. I use the term “front-end” because firewall capability is built directly into the Linux kernel; it’s called “iptables.” Linux “firewall” programs do not run the firewall. Instead, they configure the already-existing capability, including setting it to start automatically; the kernel actually “runs” the firewall. When you first run Firestarter, a wizard starts. After a welcome screen, it asks you to select your network connection (generally,...

Ubisurfer: One Year Free 3G Access with Purchase of Netbook, Tablet

Ubisurfer: One Year Free 3G Access with Purchase of Netbook, Tablet

Podcast: EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSSInternet access is becoming a necessity. However, if you cannot afford a large data plan with caps, then maybe you should try Ubisurfer. Buy a netbook, get the internet for free for a year. Ubisurfer is a standard netbook with Windows CE or Linux. They will have a 10″ netbook and Android Tablet version soon. The netbook has an SD card slot and 3 USB connectors. For the $250 price tag, you will have 3G Internet for one year. No word if it will be 3G, CDMA, GSM or 4G. Also no word on how much a month after the 1 year, but if it’s like the European version, the internet access will be lower than most netbook plans on US carriers. Interview by Andrew McCaskey of RV News Net TPN CES 2011 Live Coverage Sponsors: Thanks to Audible for sponsoring...

Virtual Box:  Installing Arch Linux, Final Notes

Virtual Box: Installing Arch Linux, Final Notes

Read Part One. Read Part Two. Read Part Three. Once Arch is installed, you have a bare-bones Linux installation that boots to the command line. At this point, you can configure the system you want using “pacman,” the Arch software package manager, which gets excellent reviews even from folks who don’t use Arch regularly.. Most persons will want to install X (the package of software that allows graphical interfaces to run on Linux, ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture) for running their sound card, and a GUI of some sort. X comes with Tom’s Window Manager (TWM), which is quite primitive; you start applications by opening a command or terminal window and typing the command to start the program. Arch’s Unofficial Beginner’s Guide includes very good instructions for building your new system from the ground up. I pretty much copied commands from the Beginner’s Guide to build the rest...

Windows XP in Virtual Box

Windows XP in Virtual Box

I’m working on making a video of Arch and Virtual box and having trouble getting my microphone to work (I’ve not yet used a microphone with this computer). I’ll get to the last Arch post tomorrow, but, in the meantime, just for grins and giggles, here’s Windows XP shutting down in Virtual Box inside of Debian Lenny. Behind it is the Gnome Nautilus file manager and behind that is the Opera browser opened to the Linux Questions website.

Virtual Box:  Installing Arch Linux, Part 3

Virtual Box: Installing Arch Linux, Part 3

Read Part One. Read Part Two, At the end of Part Two, we had finished preparing the hard drive. Now it’s time to select packages for installation. This is much simpler than it sounds. The selection consists of choosing to install the “base” package or the “base” and “base-devel” (base plus some developer tools) packages. I chose both. Arch next presents a list of the individual items to be installed. If I had, for example, selected the “base” package, I could select additional items from the “base-devel” package at this point. Okaying that screen took me back to the main menu with Step 5: Install Packages highlighted. Pressing enter brings up a dialog informing me that installation will begin; hitting enter again displays a progress window: When this is complete, “Continue” takes you back to the main menu with Step 6: Configure System highlighted. First is choosing an...

Adventures in Reloading Linux

Adventures in Reloading Linux

I’ve been wrestling with my file server for most of the past five days. I decided to upgrade the OS from Slackware 13.0, which was running like a charm, to 13.1, primarily hoping there might be drivers to better support my new 17″ monitor which I picked up for 40 bucks from a fellow who hadn’t even unpacked it from the shipping carton. First, just for the experience, I tried to do an in place upgrade, which, with Slackware, is a manual, not an automatic process. (Since the computer is a file server that usually just sits there and quietly serves, I usually just blow away the OS and reinstall.) I went through the instructions carefully and rebooted, then realized, after a couple of glitches, that, like a dummy, I had mixed the 13.0 CD 2 in with the 13.1 CDs (there are three installation CDs and an...

XAMPP Webhosting Package

XAMPP Webhosting Package

The XAMPP project produces pre-configured webhosting packages based on Apache, MySQL, PHP, and Perl for Linux, Windows, Mac, and (early beta) Solaris. Once you have installed it, you have all you need to run a website, including a one using an SQL database, such as a blog, on your local computer, with all the different elements configured to work with each other. It’s intended for development and testing, not for production. When it installs, it is completely without security and without password protection, though that can be changed. After implementing the security, I used it to self-host my public website for three years (eventually, the site’s database outgrew the capabilities of my P4 server and I put it on GoDaddy). I gave a presentation on XAMPP for Linux at my LUG tonight; you can download a copy of the handout (PDF).

Troubleshooting with Knoppix

Troubleshooting with Knoppix

A friend of mine purchased a surplussed EPIA-M Mini Mainboard, then got a case for it to build a mini-computer. For a hard drive, he got a Western Digital mobile SATA drive. Since the mainboard did not have SATA connectors, he got an SATA to IDE converter, hooked up an external USB DVD/CD drive, booted the computer and . . . nothing. Since I had a spare IDE drive in my test computer (it has two IDE drives and a SCSI drive it’s picked up along the way), I volunteered to test it to narrow down the trouble.

Google Closing Windows? (Updated)

Google Closing Windows? (Updated)

According to Reuters, the Financial Times (the FT requires a subscription for regular users.) reports that Google is phasing out Windows for its standard-issue employee computers. The final straw seems to have been the Chinese hack attack in April. According to the reports, Google is trying to reduce its computer security hassles. The Reuters story notes The FT quoted one Google employee as saying: “We’re not doing any more Windows. It is a security effort.” Another said: “Getting a new Windows machine now requires CIO (chief information officer) approval.” Here is an excerpt from the actual FT story: “Many people have been moved away from [Windows] PCs, mostly towards Mac OS, following the China hacking attacks,” said another. New hires are now given the option of using Apple’s Mac computers or PCs running the Linux operating system. “Linux is open source and we feel good about it,” said...

Upgrading Ubuntu Karmic Koala to Lucid Lynx (Updated)

Upgrading Ubuntu Karmic Koala to Lucid Lynx (Updated)

Saturday night, I decided to upgrade my Ubuntu laptop, having seen that the release version of Ubuntu 10.4 was available. The online process was easy. (If I used the Gnome desktop, a notification icon would have appeared in the notification area; since I use a simpler GUI, I check for updates every week or so. In this case, I heard about the release on a Linux podcast.) When I fired up the system updater, an upgrade notification appeared:

When SPARC is Gone: Bill Allen – HP Road Show Converged Infrastructure

When SPARC is Gone: Bill Allen – HP Road Show Converged Infrastructure

We all hate the word. It means extra hours and that one thing that hangs up the project until someone goes “Wait, this is how it works” and everything just makes sense. Migration We are coming up to a point where even old software needs to move forward. Legacy is not the way to go in this day and age. Staying on Legacy equipment may mean you are going to pay even more when you don’t have a choice. Bill Allen talks about why it is important to get off the old Legacy and get on a system that will bring a Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) back to the company. Bill mentions the dedicated migration centers of HP, and their single source support for Linux, Solaris, Windows and HP-UX. Most important, you will be upgrading to machines that will do the job in a fraction of time...

Fluxbox

Fluxbox

A while ago, I posted here about Fluxbox on Debian Linux. Fluxbox is a window manager or graphical user interface for Linux and Unix environments running X. Thursday night, I gave a presentation on Fluxbox at my local LUG. You can download a PDF of the handout here. The handout is not a stand-alone document; it was written to accompany the presentation and the accompanying hands-on demonstration, but it can give you an idea of some of the things you can do with Fluxbox. At the end of the document are links to sources of detailed information about Fluxbox. I have just installed VirtualBox on one of my Slackware computers. I should have fun testing stuff on that and letting you all know what I find out.

Installing Slackware Linux, Part 5:  Finishing Up

Installing Slackware Linux, Part 5: Finishing Up

This is the fifth of series of posts on installing Slackware Linux. The previous parts: Part 1: Considered why some persons find Slackware difficult to install. Part 2: Partitioned the hard drive for a clean install, as opposed to an upgrade or a dual boot installation. Part 3: Formatted the swap drive and target drive and pointed the computer to the source media. Part 4: Installed the operating system and included software and configured LiLo (the Linux Loader). This post looks at the final steps of configuring the system.

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